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Let's get this Thread to 1,000,000 pages!
I'm gonna thank every single post on this thread.
[-] The following 3 users say Thank You to lp9 for this post:
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No really, i'm gonna do it.
[-] The following 3 users say Thank You to lp9 for this post:
  • DWZ, hobblegob, Mija
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Just watch me.
[-] The following 3 users say Thank You to lp9 for this post:
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DWZ where did you go? Sad
[-] The following 3 users say Thank You to lp9 for this post:
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god damn
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Electronic spamming is the use of electronic messaging systems to send an unsolicited message (spam), especially advertising, as well as sending messages repeatedly on the same site. While the most widely recognized form of spam is email spam, the term is applied to similar abuses in other media: instant messaging spam, Usenet newsgroup spam, Web search engine spam, spam in blogs, wiki spam, online classified ads spam, mobile phone messaging spam, Internet forum spam, junk fax transmissions, social spam, spam mobile apps, television advertising and file sharing spam. It is named after Spam, a luncheon meat, by way of a Monty Python sketch about a menu that includes Spam in every dish. The food is stereotypically disliked/unwanted, so the word came to be transferred by analogy.

Spamming remains economically viable because advertisers have no operating costs beyond the management of their mailing lists, servers, infrastructures, IP ranges, and domain names, and it is difficult to hold senders accountable for their mass mailings. Because the barrier to entry is so low, spammers are numerous, and the volume of unsolicited mail has become very high. In the year 2011, the estimated figure for spam messages is around seven trillion. The costs, such as lost productivity and fraud, are borne by the public and by Internet service providers, which have been forced to add extra capacity to cope with the deluge. Spamming has been the subject of legislation in many jurisdictions.

A person who creates electronic spam is called a spammer.


Etymology

The term spam is derived from the 1970 Spam sketch of the BBC television comedy series Monty Python's Flying Circus. The sketch is set in a cafe where nearly every item on the menu includes Spam canned luncheon meat. As the waiter recites the Spam-filled menu, a chorus of Viking patrons drowns out all conversations with a song repeating "Spam, Spam, Spam, Spam… Spammity Spam! Wonderful Spam!", hence spamming the dialogue. The excessive amount of Spam mentioned references the preponderance of it and other imported canned meat products in the United Kingdom after World War II, as the country struggled to rebuild its agricultural base. Spam captured a large slice of the British market within the lower classes, and became a byword among British children of the 1960s for low-grade fodder due to its commonality, monotonous taste and cheap price, leading to the humour of the Python sketch.[citation needed]

In the 1980s the term was adopted to describe certain abusive users who frequented BBSs and MUDs, who would repeat "Spam" a huge number of times to scroll other users' text off the screen.In early chat rooms services like PeopleLink and the early days of Online America (later known as America Online or AOL), they actually flooded the screen with quotes from the Monty Python Spam sketch.[citation needed] With internet connections over phone lines, typically running at 1200 or even 300 bit/s, it could take an enormous amount of time for a spammy logo, drawn in ASCII art to scroll to completion on a viewer's terminal. Sending an irritating, large, meaningless block of text in this way was called spamming. This was used as a tactic by insiders of a group that wanted to drive newcomers out of the room so the usual conversation could continue. It was also used to prevent members of rival groups from chatting—for instance, Star Wars fans often invaded Star Trek chat rooms, filling the space with blocks of text until the Star Trek fans left. This act, previously called flooding or trashing, later became known as spamming. The term was soon applied to a large amount of text broadcast by many users.

It later came to be used on Usenet to mean excessive multiple posting—the repeated posting of the same message. The unwanted message would appear in many, if not all newsgroups, just as Spam appeared in nearly all the menu items in the Monty Python sketch. The first usage of this sense was by Joel Furr in the aftermath of the ARMM incident of March 31, 1993, in which a piece of experimental software released dozens of recursive messages onto the news.admin.policy newsgroup. This use had also become established—to spam Usenet was flooding newsgroups with junk messages. The word was also attributed to the flood of "Make Money Fast" messages that clogged many newsgroups during the 1990s.[citation needed] In 1998, the New Oxford Dictionary of English, which had previously only defined "spam" in relation to the trademarked food product, added a second definition to its entry for "spam": "Irrelevant or inappropriate messages sent on the Internet to a large number of newsgroups or users."



There was also an effort to differentiate between types of newsgroup spam. Messages that were crossposted to too many newsgroups at once – as opposed to those that were posted too frequently – were called velveeta (after a cheese product). But this term didn't persist.

History

Pre-Internet

In the late 19th Century Western Union allowed telegraphic messages on its network to be sent to multiple destinations. The first recorded instance of a mass unsolicited commercial telegram is from May 1864, when some British politicians received an unsolicited telegram advertising a dentistry shop.
History

Earliest documented spam (although the term had not yet been coined) was a message advertising the availability of a new model of Digital Equipment Corporation computers sent by Gary Thuerk to 393 recipients on ARPANET in 1978. Rather than send a separate message to each person, which was the standard practice at the time, he had an assistant, Carl Gartley, write a single mass email. Reaction from the net community was fiercely negative, but the spam did generate some sales.

Spamming had been practiced as a prank by participants in multi-user dungeon games, to fill their rivals' accounts with unwanted electronic junk.The first known electronic chain letter, titled Make Money Fast, was released in 1988.

The first major commercial spam incident started on March 5, 1994, when a husband and wife team of lawyers, Laurence Canter and Martha Siegel, began using bulk Usenet posting to advertise immigration law services. The incident was commonly termed the "Green Card spam", after the subject line of the postings. Defiant in the face of widespread condemnation, the attorneys claimed their detractors were hypocrites or "zealouts", claimed they had a free speech right to send unwanted commercial messages, and labeled their opponents "anti-commerce radicals." The couple wrote a controversial book entitled How to Make a Fortune on the Information Superhighway.

Within a few years, the focus of spamming (and anti-spam efforts) moved chiefly to email, where it remains today. Arguably, the aggressive email spamming by a number of high-profile spammers such as Sanford Wallace of Cyber Promotions in the mid-to-late 1990s contributed to making spam predominantly an email phenomenon in the public mind.[citation needed] By 2009, the majority of spam sent around the World was in the English language; spammers began using automatic translation services to send spam in other languages. In 2014, the Swiss artist M.M. Keupp reproduced original spam letters in his artist's book spam, sex, & random thoughts, interpreting them as readymades.
[-] The following 3 users say Thank You to lp9 for this post:
  • DWZ, hobblegob, Mija
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Thank farming
(2016-06-08 14:42:56)aaaaaa123456789 Wrote: Poitical correctness has gone too damn far, and then some.

>Deleates all posts discussing downsides of uncontrolled immigration.
[-] The following 3 users say Thank You to Tebbe for this post:
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Sorry I was driving
[-] The following 3 users say Thank You to DWZ for this post:
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Smile
[-] The following 3 users say Thank You to DWZ for this post:
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Grr
[-] The following 3 users say Thank You to DWZ for this post:
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I am going to take a nap
[-] The following 3 users say Thank You to DWZ for this post:
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.
[Image: tauros.gif][Image: bouffalant.gif]

[-] The following 4 users say Thank You to DD667 for this post:
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ok
[Image: tauros.gif][Image: bouffalant.gif]

[-] The following 4 users say Thank You to DD667 for this post:
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hi
[Image: tauros.gif][Image: bouffalant.gif]

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how you doin
[Image: tauros.gif][Image: bouffalant.gif]

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nekkah
[Image: tauros.gif][Image: bouffalant.gif]

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Why is this thread suddenly active?

And I just noticed that my last post here is almost a year old.
~4h3y
[-] The following 4 users say Thank You to Mana-Fire for this post:
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Ok
[Image: pMJsQyL.png?1]
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WOAH
[-] The following 4 users say Thank You to Resarekt for this post:
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I made it active
[-] The following 3 users say Thank You to DWZ for this post:
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Smile
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