Poll: ?????
Self taught
Formally taught
I dont play music
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Musicians: self taught or formally taught?
#1
Were you self taught or formally taught for music you play?


Personally I am mostly self taught. But I first learned guitar when I was like 10-11 when my elementary school music teacher taught us smoke on the water and some basic chords...I wouldnt count that as being formally taught though. 
My father also taught me some basic chords and hotel california when he bought my first acoustic guitar..again, I wouldnt call that being formally taught.
And I did have guitar lessons in middle school for like a month but barely learned anything so yea.

All in all, I dont fuck with that music theory and formal bullshit. I already like the way I play guitar and write music, why should I limit myself with rules theyll teach me in music theory?
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#2
Both.

My parents decided to put me on lessons when I was around 8 to play bugle/flugelhorn (idk what the english word is, I get both these as translation, it's kind of like a trumpet but different) and I played with a brass band for around 8 years, getting music lessons the entire time and had some music theory lessons for like 3 years as well. I quit when I was 16 years old I think because I didn't really like it all that much.

My sister bought a guitar a couple years back but never bothered to learn to play it, so she gave it to me around one and a half year ago. Since then, I've been practicing quite a bit using online lessons (justinguitar.com is pretty amazing), looking for chords from songs I really like and a couple of guitar lesson books my parents got me for my birthday. I didn't really stick to a practice schedule when I started, but the last couple of months I've been trying to practice every day. I think this weekend was the first time in a while I didn't really practice for 2 days in a row cuz I was busy.
Working on a better future
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#3
It's a bit of both.

As far as hand positions and things like that on piano/keyboard, I've self-taught myself how to play it. The same thing goes with bass guitar, percussion and ukulele.

But at the same time I played violin for years yet I never understood how reading music worked until 2 years ago. That's when I took an AP music theory class, which managed to click something in my brain to fully understand how sheet music worked. It's weird... I never fully understood how to read music in my Orchestra class, so when there were sharps or flats in a piece I adjusted my hand position on my violin to make it sound right. Because of that, relative pitch in my theory class worked well for me.
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#4
A very, very long time ago I tried to learn how to play the clarinet. My old school music teach offered me lessons which my parents thoroughly encouraged. I Never had the desire to continue to practice and showed little to no improvement even after a years worth of practice.

Recently however, I've been intrigued with the violin... We'll see where that goes
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You made a shitload of mistakes though
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#5
Had music for 5 years in high school with the concert band/harmony but meh, we only got through basic music theory (2 degrees) and they expected people who had differently pitched instruments to have a perfect ear on relative pitch. Like wth.

Pretty much learned a lot of stuff on theory myself after those, I learned to play the trumpet with a specialist but it's not like I could learn a lot more playing by myself anyway.
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#6
Both school stuff and just learning on my own basically. Music theory was especially from classes.
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#7
I don't play music, although I did have some small amounts of formal teaching in school. (Read: a lot of hours, but largely wasted because all we played was the recorder.)

But I wanted to reply to this:

(2016-10-09 21:05:43)Vaginal Chainsaw Teeth Wrote: I already like the way I play guitar and write music, why should I limit myself with rules theyll teach me in music theory?

Learning the rules doesn't mean you have to constrain yourself to them. They are tools from which you can eventually take what you want and disregard the rest.
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#8
(2016-10-10 05:54:08)aaaaaa123456789 Wrote:
(2016-10-09 21:05:43)Vaginal Chainsaw Teeth Wrote: I already like the way I play guitar and write music, why should I limit myself with rules theyll teach me in music theory?

Learning the rules doesn't mean you have to constrain yourself to them. They are tools from which you can eventually take what you want and disregard the rest.

idk man ive heard of stories of music majors being annoyed when they listen to their favorite artists because they break rules they learn in music theory
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#9
(2016-10-10 06:03:58)Vaginal Chainsaw Teeth Wrote: idk man ive heard of stories of music majors being annoyed when they listen to their favorite artists because they break rules they learn in music theory

That's definitely not everyone, and most likely not the majority either.
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#10
(2016-10-10 06:03:58)Vaginal Chainsaw Teeth Wrote:
(2016-10-10 05:54:08)aaaaaa123456789 Wrote:
(2016-10-09 21:05:43)Vaginal Chainsaw Teeth Wrote: I already like the way I play guitar and write music, why should I limit myself with rules theyll teach me in music theory?

Learning the rules doesn't mean you have to constrain yourself to them. They are tools from which you can eventually take what you want and disregard the rest.

idk man ive heard of stories of music majors being annoyed when they listen to their favorite artists because they break rules they learn in music theory

If composers in the past only stuck with the rules of theory when composing music, there would be a lack of music genre's performed nowadays.

Rap, jazz, rock, blues. Those are four different genre's I could think of that don't usually use basic 18th century music theory and they all sound great (if they're performed by the right group lol). If every composer that was in the 18th century or past then had only used 18th century music, there would be a lack of creativity or a lack of challenge. When you break restrictions of how things are done normally, sometimes it makes you innovative and well-respected for having thought of a new way of creating.

There was once a piece written in the 19th century named Beati Quorum Via that, at my high school, we performed. For me, it was boring and mostly predictable just like how most theory was back in the 18th century. I would suggest listening to it and maybe seeing what I mean. (Don't get me wrong, it's pretty, but performing it made it really predictable and VERY sight-readable).



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#11
I used to play the clarinet, but when I was taught it, it was formally taught to me

so a mixture of both? lol
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#12
To add on what Dange said, everything changed a lot since music "theory" exists. Back in antique Greece and Pythagoras, only full octaves were considered to be good harmonies. Fifths were slowly becoming accepted in the Middle Age and fourths and fifths during the Renaissance, and more and more, like sevenths, 3+ notes harmonies, etc., during the next few centuries until the burst of everything in the late 20th century. We even get things with tritones, after it was basically banned by the church in the Middle Age lol.

So yep, when people "break" stuff sometimes they just invent a new thing that sounds good.
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#13
So if were gonna break the rules of music theory, why study them in the first place?
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#14
(2016-10-10 19:53:29)Vaginal Chainsaw Teeth Wrote: So if were gonna break the rules of music theory, why study them in the first place?

People don't usually break the rules because breaking the rules is fun. (Okay, smart people don't.)
People break the rules because they find themselves unsatisfied by those rules, they find something that should be improved in their opinion, and improve it. That applies to every art, skill or profession where there are some established rules.
The "rules" are tools, which are intended to help you. Yes, you can eventually break them if you aren't satisfied by them, but you wouldn't know if you don't learn them in the first place.
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#15
(2016-10-10 19:59:54)aaaaaa123456789 Wrote:
(2016-10-10 19:53:29)Vaginal Chainsaw Teeth Wrote: So if were gonna break the rules of music theory, why study them in the first place?

People don't usually break the rules because breaking the rules is fun. (Okay, smart people don't.)
People break the rules because they find themselves unsatisfied by those rules, they find something that should be improved in their opinion, and improve it. That applies to every art, skill or profession where there are some established rules.
The "rules" are tools, which are intended to help you. Yes, you can eventually break them if you aren't satisfied by them, but you wouldn't know if you don't learn them in the first place.

Rules don't really help anyone in any way, they just tell you what to do and what not to do. This is why I think rules in music theory limits people to a certain way to make music instead of their own unique style. So unless you want to study music as a boring math course instead of making it through your own creativity, I wouldn't bother studying music theory.
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#16
(2016-10-10 21:35:03)Vaginal Chainsaw Teeth Wrote:
(2016-10-10 19:59:54)aaaaaa123456789 Wrote:
(2016-10-10 19:53:29)Vaginal Chainsaw Teeth Wrote: So if were gonna break the rules of music theory, why study them in the first place?

People don't usually break the rules because breaking the rules is fun. (Okay, smart people don't.)
People break the rules because they find themselves unsatisfied by those rules, they find something that should be improved in their opinion, and improve it. That applies to every art, skill or profession where there are some established rules.
The "rules" are tools, which are intended to help you. Yes, you can eventually break them if you aren't satisfied by them, but you wouldn't know if you don't learn them in the first place.

Rules don't really help anyone in any way, they just tell you what to do and what not to do. This is why I think rules in music theory limits people to a certain way to make music instead of their own unique style. So unless you want to study music as a boring math course instead of making it through your own creativity, I wouldn't bother studying music theory.

I don't even know why you keep thinking music theory is about "rules", it really just is a bunch of musical knowledge that is good to know, like no one is gonna critic your song because "omg he didn't use the phrygian mode on his A scale what a scandal".

ax6 meant rules as in rules in general. I know you like skateboard, so think of music theory as a book: "How-to's and figures", nothing stops you from making your own figures or modifying anything that exists for your own needs.
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#17
(2016-10-10 21:55:26)Luna Wrote:
(2016-10-10 21:35:03)Vaginal Chainsaw Teeth Wrote:
(2016-10-10 19:59:54)aaaaaa123456789 Wrote: People don't usually break the rules because breaking the rules is fun. (Okay, smart people don't.)
People break the rules because they find themselves unsatisfied by those rules, they find something that should be improved in their opinion, and improve it. That applies to every art, skill or profession where there are some established rules.
The "rules" are tools, which are intended to help you. Yes, you can eventually break them if you aren't satisfied by them, but you wouldn't know if you don't learn them in the first place.

Rules don't really help anyone in any way, they just tell you what to do and what not to do. This is why I think rules in music theory limits people to a certain way to make music instead of their own unique style. So unless you want to study music as a boring math course instead of making it through your own creativity, I wouldn't bother studying music theory.

I don't even know why you keep thinking music theory is about "rules", it really just is a bunch of musical knowledge that is good to know, like no one is gonna critic your song because "omg he didn't use the phrygian mode on his A scale what a scandal".

ax6 meant rules as in rules in general. I know you like skateboard, so think of music theory as a book: "How-to's and figures", nothing stops you from making your own figures or modifying anything that exists for your own needs.

imo the only thing i feel like i could get from music theory are probably odd time signatures, a few scales, learning eighth, sixteenth, quarter, etc notes and a bunch of other stuff but i wouldnt probably ever get into the rules of how you should be making music
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#18
(2016-10-10 22:07:17)Vaginal Chainsaw Teeth Wrote: i wouldnt probably ever get into the rules of how you should be making music

That's the thing, there are none, ultimately.
Nothing stops you from making a song in 13/8 (3-3-3-2-2) at 180 bpm and 7/4 60 bpm alternatively using a G minor harmonic scale, you do what you want with the knowledge you have Tongue
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#19
(2016-10-10 22:14:32)Luna Wrote:
(2016-10-10 22:07:17)Vaginal Chainsaw Teeth Wrote: i wouldnt probably ever get into the rules of how you should be making music

That's the thing, there are none, ultimately.
Nothing stops you from making a song in 13/8 (3-3-3-2-2) at 180 bpm and 7/4 60 bpm alternatively using a G minor harmonic scale, you do what you want with the knowledge you have Tongue

there definitely are rules 

http://davesmey.com/theory/partwritingrules.pdf
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#20
I have had about 10-11 years of formal piano classes (including theory, history, harmony, whatever the fuck else). Unfortunately, I haven't actually touched any of the theory stuff in years (and what I have covered is very basic) and so I am very rusty in that area. Also holy shit I suck at harmony.
If I had the time, I would try and self-teach myself how to play the guitar. I have very basic knowledge of how to play the guitar (which was also from close-enough-to-formal lessons).

I don't compose music, but basic music theory has helped me in terms of learning and practicing pieces. There's also minor things that someone self-taught in, say, piano might miss compared to someone formally trained when it comes to performance.
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