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Huge and Important Flight
#1
Today I have just completed the longest flight of my aviation experience by exponential margin. This flight had to be at least one 250 nautical mile (nm) straight line distance and three total landings at three different airports (one landing each). Effectively this was over 500nm long (527nm in total) and I sat in a cramped cockpit for 5.7 hours (reference of how cramped: (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5aMEqRMel3s)). The route was from the St. Louis Area -> Lexington, Kentucky (Blue Grass Airport) -> Louisville, Kentucky (Bowman Field) -> St. Louis Area. This is a requirement to get my commercial pilot certification.

The experience was great since I had a lot of contact with "the big boys" of these international airports and maneuvering around their busier/stricter airspaces, as well as commerical jets. This was most apparent going in and out of Bowman Field (Attached picture: Bowman is the smaller field to the northeast) since it is the smaller Louisville airport (blue dashed lines), and it is kind of shoe-horned in Louisville International's (Standiford Field) stricter airspace (magenta solid lines). Coming back from Lexington, I had enough fuel and a great tailwind so I was able to just do a touch-and-go (land and take-off in one motion), which caused the controllers to kind of "scramble" (I kind of did not give them too much time on the intention, but they were still solid) and vector me around the airspace, including flying over the south end of Standiford while talking to its control tower. I will give great credit to all of the Louisville controllers since they did an exceptional job with all of the aircraft.

It was also pretty cool flying over the city of Louisville and seeing landmarks such as Churchill Downs Horse Racing Track (most famous horse racing track in the United States).

All in all, the flight was very cool (and boring when over Illinois and Indiana farmland) and I learned a lot from operating in these airspaces. I mainly discussed only Louisville for brevity and because it had the most going on. I most likely will not do a trip like that in a while (probably not until after university), but I hope I can do something that big again in a general aviation plane; the only condition is that I have a much more comfortable plane. 

Part of Louisville Airspace:
[Image: api?req=map&type=sectc&lat=38.227984&lon...height=240]
[Image: ebvLbre.jpg]
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#2
You people and your weird units... applies even more so to pilots and sailors, using those weird nautical miles that nobody else uses. I think it's just below a thousand kilometers total, but it's 6 in the morning and my mental math may be a bit off. (1 nmi = 1852 m. I'll avoid "nm" as it actually means nanometers.)

Anyway, that seems like an interesting flight! The cockpit didn't seem too cramped in the video, but I guess it would feel that way after 6 hours.
Also, do you really think there's any hope for us mere mortals to understand that aviation map? Tongue
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#3
Yea 527 nanometers
(2016-06-08 14:42:56)aaaaaa123456789 Wrote: Poitical correctness has gone too damn far, and then some.

>Deleates all posts discussing downsides of uncontrolled immigration.
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#4
Just used good ole’ Google and it comes out to 976.004 kilometers. At least Celsius is used for temperature/dew point and UTC (referred to as Zulu) is used for time. With the weird units, I always reference wind in knots now instead of MPH out of habit, which screws with all of my friends.

No, I did not expect anyone to understand the chart without having to do a whole lesson, but I did want to show the close proximity of the airports. I completely understand because the symbology is weird and some airspace’s are just a mess (Dallas, TX; Washington D.C.; and the New York metro area).
[Image: ebvLbre.jpg]
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#5
Knots and MPH are close enough to just skip the conversion for small numbers, and use a simple 10% factor for larger ones and be reasonably close. (I know it's actually about 15%, but 10% is easy to calculate for people who aren't used to doing math in their heads.) As for Zulu time, that's one of those weird US-made conventions that somehow made it into an international standard, although without the name.

Also, if you wanted to show how close the airports were, couldn't you have used a regular map (e.g., from Google Maps) with pins?
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#6
Sounds like you've got a future
I don't have a sicknature
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#7
My mistake on describing my reasoning for the sectional. I should have put “airspaces” instead of “airports” since that was what I was showing by posting the sectional. I have to establish two-way radio communication (I say: “my call sign (for example’s sake: N123AB), Standiford Tower” and they reply “Standiford Tower, N123AB” (at minimum of what must be said) before entering the magenta line or else I get the dreaded, “N123AB, I need you to write down a number,” meaning I violated something which in this case is illegally entering their airspace.

How this goes back to what happened on the trip, on departure from Bowman, Bowman Tower told me to fly a heading of 250°(West-Southwest and right into Standiford’s airspace) and maintain a certain altitude once I got there. Then I was handed off to Standiford Tower and given their frequency. Before I entered the airspace, I had to input their frequency, activate it, then wait 3-5 seconds to make sure the frequency was clear so I did not “step-on” anyone else’s transmission, call up Standiford, and wait for their response in order to enter. To add, I also had to fly the plane correctly too.

Sorry for the long-winded and a little technical answer (also sorry for some technical information earlier). I just want to be thorough in explaining my reasoning and what was going on.
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#8
That explains it.

(2018-07-15 15:41:55)Uptight 534 Wrote: or else I get the dreaded, “N123AB, I need you to write down a number”
That's an odd way of informing people of violations; what does it even mean?
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#9
Phone number to call whatever controlling agency it is (Tower, approach/departure, etc) on the ground. I am not sure of the whole and exact chain of events, but they talk to you about it and then send it to the higher ups in the FAA and they deal with it as necessary (remedial training, suspension, or revoking your license).
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