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Terrible COBOL code ruined statistics and...
#1
Title of Article:Bug of COBOL program ruined labour statistics Wrote:We

Source (I don't think English version is available)

Too long; can't translate in this night; well, to summarize,
  • Only one or two staffs of them can understand COBOL.
  • They left the bug for fourteen years.
  • This affected unemployment insurance to have about 80-billion-yen error.
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#2
It's probably just another case of underpaid overworked incompetent inefficient programmers and their management who only care about making things look fine on the outside
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#3
It's okay. In three months you people are going to have so many software bugs that you won't have time to even count them, let alone write up on them.
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#4
(2019-01-26 03:32:33)aaaaaa123456789 Wrote: It's okay. In three months you people are going to have so many software bugs that you won't have time to even count them, let alone write up on them.

why?
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#5
(2019-02-01 04:07:15)self Wrote:
(2019-01-26 03:32:33)aaaaaa123456789 Wrote: It's okay. In three months you people are going to have so many software bugs that you won't have time to even count them, let alone write up on them.

why?

The current Japanese emperor is going to abdicate on the 30th of April, to be succeeded by his son starting on the 1st of May.

The Japanese calendar, which is still very much in use alongside the Gregorian one, counts days and months the same as our usual one, but years since the start of the era; each era (nowadays, and at least since the Meiji era starting in 1868) starts when an emperor rises to the throne. Akihito's reign started on the 7th of January, 1989, so the current date would be Heisei year 31 month 2 day 1. (The month and day, as you can tell, are just the same as our calendar's; today is the 1st of February.)

On the 1st of May, a new era will start, and the year counter will reset to 1. Note that we don't even know what the new era will be called; this is decided by the Japanese government. While they promised to announce it a few months in advance (namely, this month) because of the current issue with computer systems, that's still too short of a notice.

Many systems have the current era and start date hardcoded, as well as the list of eras. Many people just didn't plan ahead of the current emperor of Japan abdicating or dying within their systems' lifetimes. As a result, many systems will display the wrong era, and will refuse to accept dates written for what will be the right era. Moreover, since the year counter resets whenever a new era starts, the correct year number after the 1st of May will be 1, yet these systems will expect 31 for 2019, and treat 1 as 1989.

The problem is pretty much equivalent to the year 2000 problem, but affecting Japanese systems only. The cost of fixing existing systems is estimated to be similar, but the problem is made worse by the fact that people didn't plan in advance for this; everyone could see the year 2000 coming, but this was announced last year.

The fact that we don't know the name of the era makes things worse. The Unicode consortium has already reserved a character for the new era, to go along the four they already have for every era since Meiji. However, since they don't know how the era will be spelled, they can't actually add this character to the standard (there are several good technical reasons why they cannot add placeholders). Not adding the character means that nobody can use the character — including OSes which use them to display dates.

It's a fun little mess that will explode in their faces.
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#6
(2019-02-01 07:58:04)aaaaaa123456789 Wrote: The Unicode consortium has already reserved a character for the new era, to go along the four they already have for every era since Meiji. However, since they don't know how the era will be spelled, they can't actually add this character to the standard (there are several good technical reasons why they cannot add placeholders). Not adding the character means that nobody can use the character — including OSes which use them to display dates.

I don't understand this. Invalid characters can be used, just not properly displayed, right? Like they can be visually replaced with a default "invalid or unknown character" symbol. Why can't they do this, and then that problem will be solved whenever the font is updated?

Also what do you mean by "placeholder"? An official way to display it until the correct / final version is known?
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#7
Well. That topic related to people's insurance, and let's imagine what would happen....
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