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2020 Resolutions?
#1
The New Year is fast approaching, and I was wanting to know if any of you guys have a New Years Resolution?

Has this year taught you anything? And do you have any plans for NYE?

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#2
I don't think New Year Resolutions are a thing where I'm from, I think I only heard it for the first time on JV

I wouldn't decide goals by the years, I do keep a long term goal and a usually also a few shorter term ones. But a lot can change within a year, some goals will lose priority and others you will realize the importance of.
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#3
This year, my resolution was to get a job. I achieved that! Next year, it's to get my license. Driving currently terrifies me, but I wanna get comfortable with it so I can drive myself to work and (hopefully) my own place in the future.

As for New Years Eve, I have nothing planned yet. Perhaps I'll do something, I dunno.
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#4
(2019-01-01 16:04:06)Uptight 534 Wrote: Eat a bit cleaner and not be a gavone (Italian for “glutton”).

This was from last year's thread and I can say that I accomplished both. (For reference, I am 5'10" (177.8 cm)) At this point last year, from a fairly sedentary lifestyle and binge-eating some foods, I was ~165 lb (74.8 kg) and pretty doughy with areas of fat that needed to go. I dropped to ~143 lb (64.9 kg) by cutting mainly fat and, unfortunately, a little muscle. Mainly I changed my diet to eating cleaner, more balanced, and in moderation (not eating a whole jar of peanut butter a day really helped), as well as getting in some more walking in my life and an active job. 

As for the rest of the year, I have just started getting ready for post-graduate life and learning to prepare myself for it.

For my resolution(s) for 2020, I would say work on being more active and start trying to put on some more lean muscle mass, since I am a bit skinny-fat.  As for New Year's, it will be the usual party with the neighbors.
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#5
I simply have to survive, there's nothing much I can do right now, and I don't care about yearly goals.
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#6
I can't say I've ever had any New Year's resolutions. If you want to make a change, why wait until the first of January?

As for my plans for the actual day, well, it's the same as every year — have dinner with family and receive the new year that way. This time we're probably going to go to my cousin's house, who lives in the suburbs and has a nice backyard, unlike our city apartments — if the weather doesn't ruin things again. (When we first tried that, for Christmas 2012, the 24th greeted us with a 52.3°C heat index that made it impossible to stay outside. Hottest day I've seen in my life...)
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#7
Not because of the new year, but I decided to start eating fish regularly a few days ago. My diet isn't exactly healthy.
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#8
I'm simplifying it: to be alive every day.
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#9
(2019-12-28 14:10:35)SouthAnd960 Wrote: I'm simplifying it: to be alive every day.

Death penalty.
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#10
(2019-12-28 08:01:26)aaaaaa123456789 Wrote: If you want to make a change, why wait until the first of January?

Because they're meant to be long-term resolutions that you stick by, or ones that you can't immediately change. Unfortunately, resolutions rarely work for most people. I think I heard 80-90% of resolutions made on January 1st are abandoned within a month.

Oh, and I thought of another resolution. I have no credit score, so in 2020, I'm making it my goal to build up a credit.
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#11
I agree that resolutions aren't that effective a lot of the time. Nobody gives a shit about New Year's by about March or April. In order to change habits, you need to have motivation beyond that. 

That being said, I prefer goals for the New Year's instead. These are all things that I am already working on.

My goals are:

- To finally get a 6 Pack and a body I really like 
 [I used to be a scrawny guy and now I have a decent amount of muscle but there's still a lot of work to be done. I will do this by tracking my calories and macros and doing a consistent gym plan]
- Get a real job that I enjoy
[Recently graduated, don't have a "real job". I think I chose the wrong field but I am still hoping I can get a decent paying job that I enjoy.]
- Get my finances in order
[I need money so that I am financially independent and I need to move away from my abusive family. I also want to get a master's degree sometime in the future but would rather not be in debt to do so. If I can save CAN$20,000 by the end of 2020 I think I might be in decent shape. To do this, I want to have a decent paying job and work during weekends at my summer job. ]
- Improve my mental health 
[Still and work in progress. Had a meltdown at the beginning of this year and made a ton of progress with a therapist and want to make some more. I am still seeing a therapist. To improve my mental health, I will continue to meditate and exercise every day and try to get into a journaling habit]
- Make a new friend group
[Since I recently graduated, I am isolated from a lot of my friends. I want to make new friends and have a regular social life. To do this, I will go to social events and join clubs. Its gonna be tough though]

This year kinda sucked for me so I hope next year goes a lot better.
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#12
eh I don't do these
either I wanted to do it before the date or I'd lose interest soon after if I made it up on the spot
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#13
(2019-12-28 08:01:26)aaaaaa123456789 Wrote: I can't say I've ever had any New Year's resolutions. If you want to make a change, why wait until the first of January?

(2019-12-28 15:45:13)Mystery Wrote: Because they're meant to be long-term resolutions that you stick by, or ones that you can't immediately change. Unfortunately, resolutions rarely work for most people. I think I heard 80-90% of resolutions made on January 1st are abandoned within a month.

Actually I always thought the same about it being stupid to set resolutions/goals just for New Years, when if you see a way to improve yourself you could just take it up immediately. It has only recently occurred to me that the reason its so common is because the end of the year normally invites individuals to reflect: on their life, achievements and failures, and their happiness. Reflecting isn't actually something that most people tend to do on a regular basis, unless they're already in the habit of it. So it just becomes the right time to notice things you want to change and make plans to change them Smile


As for my response
I'm just looking forward to a happy and successful 2020. I think this year will probably be one of the most important in my life, since I'll be finishing my final year of my university degree and beginning my career thereafter. This is official adulthood! My main goal is to put in the best effort I can into everything I do this year, with more specific goals to help along the way, like: finally remembering to keep track of the date, ensuring I've allocated a minimum of 2 days a week for myself to prepare and study, and putting myself out there (extracurriculars and events).

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#14
to be the best father i can be
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#15
(2019-12-28 15:45:13)Mystery Wrote:
(2019-12-28 08:01:26)aaaaaa123456789 Wrote: If you want to make a change, why wait until the first of January?

Because they're meant to be long-term resolutions that you stick by, or ones that you can't immediately change. Unfortunately, resolutions rarely work for most people. I think I heard 80-90% of resolutions made on January 1st are abandoned within a month.

Oh, and I thought of another resolution. I have no credit score, so in 2020, I'm making it my goal to build up a credit.

What does building up a credit mean?

I don't take new year's resolutions very seriously; I hardly ever write any and usually don't look back to them ever after.
This year, I decided I'd write down all the objectives I more or less wish I could reach. It's just a nice way to clarify all that to me. I put them in a word file named "Crazy list of objectives and ideas for 2020 that will absolutely not necessarily lead me to happiness", because reaching ambitious goals is usually less effective at that than having a good group of friends and a balanced life. Here's some of them:

- Reaching a low HSK6 Chinese level by the end of the year (quite unrealistic since I started this Summer)
- Cooking all the recipes of a cooking book: being French, it was very easy to get tons of cooking books, old and new, but I usually just skim through them.
- Ask my grandmothers for all their recipes and write them all down for archive.
- Finish reading the majority of the books that were given to me as gifts.
- Dreaming again. As a kid, I used to write down my dreams a lot, and I think my relationship to reality was very different because of that.
- Getting to know my homecity, Paris, better. I know some places, but I'd like to feel at home in most of Paris - knowing where the good and cheap eats are, where to find the well-hidden funny stuff, the historical anecdotes...
- Seeing one of the internet-friends I've never met, albeit having known her for four years already.
- Reading the Bible. I'm not a believer, just curious.
- Developping some of the app/game ideas that I've had. The most important one to me is an app that would mend our relationship with our smartphones. The way I see it, it would allow you to set custom rules for the delivery of data from the internet to your smartphone. For instance, you could decide for each whatsapp contact and conversation whether you want to receive their messages every hour, or twice a day (like a mailbox). My brother often complains about how smartphones invade our whole lives and we both believe we should return to slower, more humane and real interactions. The very big challenge is how to make that compatible with living not a secluded life in the XXIst century. The app I'd like to make is an attempt at that: it would allow my brother to instantly receive messages from his girlfriend and family, and filter out the rest to a slower pace. I know there is already a google project of the sort for notifications, but I think we only feel truly free when our phone is no different than a giant dictionary or a stone.
- Composing music with a computer software. Humans aside, I have loved nothing more than music and I've been wanting to try composing on a computer for the last five years, and never dared it with enough perseverance yet.
- Getting to know most birds - their appearance, their singing; and the trees and flowers as well. It's important to me because I feel going out in nature becomes a much richer experience afterwards, it's like becoming familiar with a foreign language. It also helps when reading books with lots of nature.

It's a bit of an issue that I have no big sport goals; I'd like to get more active, too, but I don't think I'm going to make the time for that.
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#16
(2020-01-03 21:07:34)Ilraon Wrote: What does building up a credit mean?

Banking and financial institutions keep track of people's ability to repay borrowed money, which they use to determine whether to give them further loans, and so on. That kind of information is often consolidated into a single rating, typically called a credit scoring.

In most places around the world, that's just a value that banks use as part of their process when you ask for a loan, and it has very little relevance in people's lives otherwise, to the point most people (myself included) wouldn't even know how to find out their scoring, let alone how to read it or what it means — it's a financial technicality that nobody cares about. However, in the US, where he lives, for some reason, people have grown to care too much about credit scores — to the point even job applications will ask for them. It doesn't make much sense, but that's the way it is, and since the only way of increasing your credit score is to borrow money and repay it timely (even if you have no need to borrow it in the first place), the system forces them to do exactly that — often achieved by using credit cards for small purchases and paying them off when the statement comes (since credit card payments are essentially zero-interest short-term loans).
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#17
(2020-01-04 09:30:03)aaaaaa123456789 Wrote:
(2020-01-03 21:07:34)Ilraon Wrote: What does building up a credit mean?

Banking and financial institutions keep track of people's ability to repay borrowed money, which they use to determine whether to give them further loans, and so on. That kind of information is often consolidated into a single rating, typically called a credit scoring.

In most places around the world, that's just a value that banks use as part of their process when you ask for a loan, and it has very little relevance in people's lives otherwise, to the point most people (myself included) wouldn't even know how to find out their scoring, let alone how to read it or what it means — it's a financial technicality that nobody cares about. However, in the US, where he lives, for some reason, people have grown to care too much about credit scores — to the point even job applications will ask for them. It doesn't make much sense, but that's the way it is, and since the only way of increasing your credit score is to borrow money and repay it timely (even if you have no need to borrow it in the first place), the system forces them to do exactly that — often achieved by using credit cards for small purchases and paying them off when the statement comes (since credit card payments are essentially zero-interest short-term loans).

Exactly. And the only reason I care about getting a good credit score is because I plan on getting a house in the future. If I have no credit score, the bank won't approve me for a loan on a house. I don't have any financial reason to build up credit. I guess showing the bank that I have a steady income (and can easily make payments with it) isn't good enough.
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#18
My New Years resolution is to go on dates. It's hard to ask a lot of the time!
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#19
Dont forget that a lot of credit cards have rewards programs. For example one of mine allows me to get 5% cash back on Amazon, which is basically a free discount just for using the card. Treat them as cash and don't buy things you can't afford and you'll be good.
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#20
(2020-01-05 00:26:11)Legend Wrote: Dont forget that a lot of credit cards have rewards programs. For example one of mine allows me to get 5% cash back on Amazon, which is basically a free discount just for using the card. Treat them as cash and don't buy things you can't afford and you'll be good.

I generally use mine because it's zero-interest as long as you pay your statement in full by the end of the month. With 4% monthly inflation, borrowing money at 0% and putting it in a term deposit at 3.5% (per month) is a clear benefit.
That kind of thing requires being very careful to avoid overspending, though, which is something that most people can't do properly. CCs here charge you a completely absurd interest rate if you carry a balance (my statements state an effective annual rate of 210% and 294% — no, I didn't forget a period there): that's their business, tempting you to overspend.
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