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I think I have isolophobia
#1
Remember when I made a post about depression? I came to realize that when I'm around people (Wether online or irl) I feel good, but after a period of time alone I'll feel depressed.

So to stay positive I need to stay with people I guess, I'm trying to be more open with my feelings to people and spend more time with them.

This friday I'm going to the psychiatrist so I'll see if they can confirm it.
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#2
That sounds like the opposite of myself. I don't like bearing others' presence for an extended amount of time (especially irl) and eventually become cranky and frustrated.

Though this actually also sounds a lot like being an extrovert vs introvert. Requiring time with people vs alone to recharge and quickly feeling exhausted with the other one. Just to a more extreme degree than usual.

(edit)

I don't know if it'll help you appreciate alone time any more, but I greatly appreciate alone time because I'm absolutely free to do what I want (and there are many things that I want to do), there's no distracting, noisy external stimulus coming from others' presence and speech (who may interrupt your train of thoughts) so it's a lot more relaxing, and when you're alone you can do things like reading, learning, and make stuff (music, games, drawings, programs etc) with maximum efficiency, again because you can be relaxed and without external distraction.

It's mostly the relaxation and productivity that being alone brings that makes me happy, and the (eventual) lack of which makes me eventually unhappy when with people. Though I know that some people will actually be MORE comfortable when they're with people, again, introversion vs extroversion.
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#3
(2020-01-30 02:19:16)Verdusk Wrote: That sounds like the opposite of myself. I don't like bearing others' presence for an extended amount of time (especially irl) and eventually become cranky and frustrated. Though this actually also sounds a lot like being an extrovert vs introvert. Requiring time with people vs alone to recharge and quickly feeling exhausted with the other one. Just to a more extreme degree than usual. (edit) I don't know if it'll help you appreciate alone time any more, but I greatly appreciate alone time because I'm absolutely free to do what I want (and there are many things that I want to do), there's no distracting, noisy external stimulus coming from others' presence and speech (who may interrupt your train of thoughts) so it's a lot more relaxing, and when you're alone you can do things like reading, learning, and make stuff (music, games, drawings, programs etc) with maximum efficiency, again because you can be relaxed and without external distraction. It's mostly the relaxation and productivity that being alone brings that makes me happy, and the (eventual) lack of which makes me eventually unhappy when with people. Though I know that some people will actually be MORE comfortable when they're with people, again, introversion vs extroversion.

I'm kind of a weird case. I like a balance of both. I can spend time with people, but if I do it for too long I get tired, and vice-versa.
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#4
(2020-01-30 04:41:23)Residays Wrote:
(2020-01-30 02:19:16)Verdusk Wrote: snip

I'm kind of a weird case. I like a balance of both. I can spend time with people, but if I do it for too long I get tired, and vice-versa.

It's a both for the vast majority of people, it's just the point of balance differs from person to person, i.e. even extroverts get tired if they hang out with people all the time and need time alone, even introverts get tired it they're alone all the time and need to spend some time with people, just that the extrovert would be content with spending more time with people compared to the introvert, and vice versa for time alone. So just different proportions.

The word "introvert" and "extrovert" only mean the two sides in the sliding scale, and people fall somewhere in-between, some more extreme and some closer to the middle.

If you're very, very close to the exact middle point (which would be like a statistical average, if it were so easily measured) you'd be what people call "ambivert", but chances are that you lean towards one of the two directions.
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#5
I was reading this as islamophobia and was expecting an entirely different blog

This is really common for people who have experienced depression and some form of social anxiety and/or isolation. It's a struggle to accept and have confidence in your friendships/relationships when you're apart from them and can't get constant verification that you are still friends, that you do still have a connection with that person/others, and that everything is fine.
It can also, to some extent, be a problem that you attach a lot of your happiness to other people -- but I don't think that's unusual when friendships are something you've struggled to have and maintain for a long time. In other words, I'd say a lot of what you're experiencing stems from the anxiety of having this happiness ripped away from you, and the times when you're alone away from your friends is something that you associate or in a way, simulates that fear.

It's good to take a step back when you can and just think through it and reflect. Analyse as best as you can what that feeling is and where it's coming from. Try to rationalise it. Are you only thinking about it from the worst perspective possible? Are you only able to think of it with your insecurities in mind? Remember that what we think isn't always entirely rational or real. Reality is often a lot simpler and nicer than our expectations are, especially when you struggle with mental health.
It's just going to be a process of learning to accept it and have more faith in yourself Smile

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#6
Isolophobia sounds more like a *fear* of being alone rather than feeling unpleasant when alone. I also think your feelings are kind of typical, humans are social animals and I feel very similar.

I hope your psychiatrist appointment goes well.
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